Choreographies
The Corsair
8 Feb 2021
The Corsair

Rome Opera Ballet

  • Ballet in Two Acts
  • Libretto by Vernoy De Saint Georges and Joseph Mazilier based on The Corsair by George G. Byron
  • Coreography: José Carlos Martínez (after M. Petipa)
  • Music: Adolphe-Charles Adam,Cesare Pugni, Léo Delibes, Riccardo Drigo
  • Musical Arrangement: Alexei Baklan
  • Set and costume designer: Francesco Zito
  • Lighting Designer: Vinicio Cheli
  • Assistant Choreographer: Agnes Letestu
  • Sets and Costumes by Theatre de L’Opera de Rome

* World premiere by the Rome Opera Ballet on March 1, 2020

Ljubljana National Theater Opera Ballet

El Corsario, producción Ballet de la Ópera de Liubliana

The Corsair, Ljubljana Opera Ballet

  • Ballet in two acts
  • Libretto: Jules-Henri Vernoy de Saint-Georges based on the motifs of the poem The Corsair by George Noel Gordon Byron
  • Coreography: José Carlos Martínez (after M. Petipa)
  • Music: Adolphe-Charles Adam and Cesare Pugni, Léo Delibes, Riccardo Drigo
  • Musical Arrangement: Alexei Baklan
  • Set Designer: Matej Filipčič
  • Drawings: Dejan Mesarič, Nastja Miheljak
  • Costume Designer: Iñaki Cobos Guerrero
  • Lighting Designer: Jasmin Šehić
  • Assistant Choreographer: Anael Martín
  • Assistant Set Designer: Nastja Miheljak
  • Sets and Costumes by Theatre Workshop SNG Opera in balet Ljubljana and SNG Drama Ljubljana

* Premiere on September 23, 2020 with the Ljubliana Opera Ballet

Excerpts from the Interview with the Choreographer by Natasa Jelie

I thought it was reasonable to make a »purified« version of the ballet, composed of two parts, i.e. a fairy tale, similar to Giselle or The Nutcracker. I also opted for a simplified dramaturgy, woven around the main characters of Medora and Conrad. I set up the ballet’s structure in advance, of course, and then later or, conveyed my ideas to the dancers in the rehearsal studios of the Ljubljana Opera and tried to find the best way for them to present the story to the audience.

As I usually do, I wrote the libretto for my version of Le Corsaire by myself, because I always want to tell the story my way. I entrusted the reading of the libretto to my colleagues, but only to check its comprehensibility. I found the inspiration for the story as in the Lord Byron’s poem, as well as in the original score by Adolphe Adam, which I also changed where necessary. As I already mentioned before, it was not my intention to make an entirely new version of this ballet, but only a more comprehensible and purified one. Since the story of Le Corsaire is not as familiar to the audience as those of The Nutcracker or Giselle, its structure had to be simple. Meanwhile, the task of the dancers will be to present the story to the audience as directly and fluently as possible. Therefore, what the audience will be able to see, is a story of love between the two main protagonists, their well-known companions Gulnare, Birbanto, Lankendem, the pirates, and the wealthy Pasha whose aim is to seduce Conrad’s beloved girl …

I kept all the traditional parts of the ballet and among them, of course, the Pas de deux, one of the most famous and frequently performed classical ballet fragments, which became popular among the audiences particularly in its interpretation by the unsurpassed ballet dancers Margot Fonteyn and Rudolf Nureyev. The spectators will also recognise all the other traditional scenes from this ballet: Pas d’esclave, Le jardin animé, Pas de trois des odalisques … etc. I took the liberty of playing with the movement material left by Patipa this time as well. Thus, I kept only the form of the scenes and just a part of the ballet’s original settings and steps, and choreographed the rest myself. But I am quite positive that the spectators will recognise in my choreography, which of course is not entirely classical, quite a few details that will strongly resemble the one that was once conceived by the great master Petipa.

Although I used the time we had at home during the coronavirus lockdown to think about my new projects, I also had some extra time to reconsider all the choreographic material I did for Le Corsaire. Therefore I decided to change »a thing or two« so that we will finally be able to see in this postponed premiere, the ballet’s more “mature” version.

Sometimes choreographers change their choreography when they come back to tha Company for the revival of their ballet and as a rule, its “second” version is much better because they have time to think about the work they did. Here I had this extra time before the premiere, so rather than anything else, I chose to embrace it as a most welcome opportunity.

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The Corsair, by José C. Martínez, receives the D&D Award for the best ballet production in Italy
14 Jan 2021
The Corsair, by José C. Martínez, receives the D&D Award for the best ballet production in Italy

The version that José Carlos Martínez premiered in spring 2020, with the Rome Opera Ballet has won the Danza&Danza award for the best classical production of the year in Italy.

The Corsair, José Carlos Martínez, Romme.

© Yasuko Kageyama

Last spring, the Rome Opera Ballet, directed by Eleonora Abbagnato, premiered a new version of El Corsario, choreographed by José Carlos Martínez. The production, whose functions were interrupted by the coronavirus, has just been awarded one of the most important awards given in Italy. This is the Danza&Danza Award for the best classical production of 2020.

The D&D Awards were born in 1987 and have become the annual awards that recognize excellence in dance. Each year, specialized critics review classical and contemporary productions, the best dancers, choreographers and rising stars before awarding the awards.

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New Year Concert 2021
5 Jan 2021
New Year Concert 2021

José Carlos Martínez has made history by being the only choreographer who has participated, two consecutive years, in the Vienna New Year’s Concert. His choreographies have once again garnered great critical and public success.

The choreographer José Carlos Martínez has repeated in 2021 the success of 2020 with his two choreographies for the Vienna New Year’s Concert, which this year was again directed by Maestro Riccardo Muti. Both the public and the critics have recognized the work of Martínez, that this edition had the extra difficulty of making the protagonists of his choreographies dance on floors not suitable for classical dance. Before collecting some of the things that have been said about the polka and the waltz that José Carlos had to choreograph, we invite you to see the pieces.

Vals de Johann Strauss “Sohn Frühlingsstimmen Walzer op 410″

“Marguerite polka-polka française op 244″ de Josef Strauss

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“Chancellor Kurz announced a re-containment on December 18. However, the conductor of the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra decided to continue the concert anyway. The Musikverein room has therefore been decorated as it should with thousands of flowers. The interludes danced by the Vienna Opera Ballet were recorded earlier in the year and are broadcast during the concert by television. Former Paris Opera principal dancer José Martinez imagined the choreographies, designed to be danced outdoors and the costumes were created by French fashion designer Christian Lacroix”.

EN24NEWS

———————————————————-

“Josef’s Margherita Polka is wonderfully majestic and chimes in the new year splendidly well; it is followed by Johann I’s Venetian Galop, an aptly named short piece performed with remarkable lightness. Johann II’s Voices of Spring encourages a typically good mood for the new year, and is performed alongside a traditional ballet that elicits a yearning not only for spring, but especially for relief from the pandemic in the coming months. The official part of the programme is rounded off with the Emperor Waltz and the Tempestuous in Love and Dance – two suitably majestic and fun pieces with lovely moments of climax. Finally, as encore, the audience is treated to more Strauss classics, including, of course, the absolute necessities that are Johann II’s Blue Danube and Johann I’s Radetzky March“.

THE UPCOMING

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Rome
19 Dec 2020
Rome

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Magical Ljubljana
18 Dec 2020
Magical Ljubljana

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Sonatas
18 Dec 2020
Sonatas
  • Choreograpy: José Carlos Martínez
  • Music:Antonio Soler (Sonatas R.45 y R.118) y Domenico Scarlatti (Sonatas K.39, K.159, K.208 y K.427)
  • Orchestration: Alfredo Aracil
  • Costumes: Agnès Letestu
  • Lighting Design: Nicolás Fischtel (A.A.I.)

Martínez’s inspiration when creating this piece starts in a profound study of Scaratti and Father Soler’s score. Like in a sonata, the choreographic phrases transform, repeat and evolve with the rhythm of the musical structure. Each dancer represents a music instrument from the orchestrated version of sonatas, playing their own choreographic score.

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Sonatas
18 Dec 2020
Sonatas
  • Choreograpy: José Carlos Martínez
  • Music:Antonio Soler (Sonatas R.45 y R.118) y Domenico Scarlatti (Sonatas K.39, K.159, K.208 y K.427)
  • Orchestration: Alfredo Aracil
  • Costumes: Agnès Letestu
  • Lighting Design: Nicolás Fischtel (A.A.I.)

Martínez’s inspiration when creating this piece starts in a profound study of Scaratti and Father Soler’s score. Like in a sonata, the choreographic phrases transform, repeat and evolve with the rhythm of the musical structure. Each dancer represents a music instrument from the orchestrated version of sonatas, playing their own choreographic score.

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José C. Martínez choreographs the New Year’s concert again
4 Dec 2020
José C. Martínez choreographs the New Year’s concert again

For the second consecutive year, the dancer and choreographer José Carlos Martínez will be responsible for the New Year’s concert in Vienna.

After the success achieved in the broadcast of the 2020 edition, the Austrian television channel ORF has once again counted on the Spanish choreographer for this 2021. It is the first time in history that the same person performs the choreography two years in a row.

“If it was already a challenge choreographing last year’s concert, doing it a second time makes the challenge even greater. I cannot repeat what I did but, at the same time, it is something traditional and you have to respect a series of guidelines ”, declared José Carlos.

José Carlos Martínez with the dancers of the Vienna Opera BalletThis year the soloists of the Vienna Opera Ballet will dance the Johann Strauss Waltz “Sohn Frühlingsstimmen Walzer op 410″, conducted, like the rest of the concert, by Maestro Riccardo Muti. The majestic gardens of the Liechtenstein Palace have been the location chosen for this piece.

Another novelty this year will be the delicate and elegant wardrobe designed by the prestigious Christian Lacroix, which further embellishes the choreographies.

The restrictions and protocols due to COVID-19 have made José Carlos work separately with each of the couples, creating 4 duos that represent the 4 seasons. Only at the end of the waltz did the eight dancers meet, and because it was an outdoor location.

“Dancing outside made the choreography evolve during filming, since dancing with pointe shoes in a dance studio is not the same as on grass or stones. Once again, I was impressed by the adaptability and attitude of the dancers at the Vienna Opera, willing to give their best throughout the recording. ”

The second choreographic piece is the “Marguerite polka-polka française op 244″ by Josef Strauss. This time, and to play with the beauty of Adolf Loos’s Looshaus, (a building built in 1909 that was initially a fashion factory, and today is a bank), José Carlos Martínez and Christian Lacroix have located the action in 1930, and through a group of young people having fun, the viewer discovers the intricacies of the building. A very theatrical choreography that takes us back to the silent film years.

The recording was made in the month of August and, for 10 days, the director, Henning Kasten, and José Carlos Martínez, worked hand in hand to adapt the choreographies created in the dance halls of the Vienna Opera, to these spaces so atypical and unprepared for classical dance.

For the Spanish choreographer, it has been a very pleasant experience, and a great pride, to have been chosen again to choreograph an event that brings together, through its international broadcast, millions of people from all over the world.

Danseurs de l'Opéra de VienneDanseurs de l'Opéra de Vienne

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José Carlos Martínez prepares his version of Giselle in Croatia
25 Nov 2020
José Carlos Martínez prepares his version of Giselle in Croatia

José Carlos Martínez is immersed in the process of creating his version of Giselle, for the Ballet of the Croatian National Theater, in Zagreb. The premiere will take place in May 2021 in the Croatian city.

Sketches by Iñaki Cobos for the costumes of José Carlos Martínez's Giselle for the Ballet of the National Theater of Croatia

Sketches by Iñaki Cobos for the costumes of José Carlos Martínez's Giselle for the Ballet of the National Theater of Croatia

Next year the members of the Croatian National Theater Ballet will stage the version of Giselle that José Carlos Martínez is creating for them. The preliminary design and production work for the sets and costumes has already begun, which will be carried out by Iñaki Cobos, a regular on Martínez’s team responsible for the costumes for Nutcracker or Corsario.
Rehearsals will begin in March 2021 and the premiere will take place in May next year.

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Next Galas
25 Nov 2020
Next Galas

Despite the complicated situation caused by COVID-19, José Carlos Martínez is organizing new star galas. The next one will take place in Murcia, at the Victorio Villegas Auditorium, on December 27 and 28, 2020, and in Pamplona, ​​on May 14, 2021 at the Auditorium of the Museum of the University of Navarra.

Galas d'Etoiles

Galas

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Incessant creative activity
23 Nov 2020
Incessant creative activity

After completing the direction of the National Dance Company of Spain, José Carlos Martínez is focused on his role as a freelance choreographer.

In March 2020 he premiered his version of “Corsair” with the Rome Opera Ballet, and in September repeated the experience with the Ljubljana Opera Ballet. Her next project will take him to Croatia, where he will create a version of “Giselle” for the Zagreb Opera Ballet, which will premiere in May 2021.

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Galas
23 Nov 2020
Galas

For a few years now, the star of the Paris Opera House and former director of the National Dance Company of Spain, José Carlos Martínez, has organized star galas that allow Spanish dancers working abroad to dance in their country.

Chirstmas Gala

Lucía Lacarra. © Jesús Vallinas

In December 2019, José Carlos returned to his homeland to present the Great Christmas Gala-Dance Stars, the first edition of a project that was born with a vocation of permanence and whose objective is to make visible the wide group of Spanish dancers who triumph outside of our borders. Belonging to prestigious companies such as The Royal Ballet of London, Het Nationale Ballet of Amsterdam, the Dresden Semperoper Ballett or the National Ballet of Spain, among others, a large representation of Spanish figures offered a program composed of classical, neoclassical and Spanish dance pieces. On that occasion, the Spanish star Lucía Lacarra headed the poster, in a gala that brought together Spanish artists like Sergio Bernal, Itziar Mendizabal, Jon Vallejo, Aída Badia, Ángel García Molinero, Sonia Vinograd and Ricardo Castellanos. In addition, international figures like Maria Kochetkova, Matthew Golding and Ryoichi Hirano participated too.

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The Nutcracker
21 Sep 2020
The Nutcracker
  • Music: Pyotr Il’yich Tchaikovsky
  • Choreography and stage direction: José Carlos Martínez
  • Conductor: Manuel Coves
  • Stage Design: Mónica Boromello
  • Costumes: Iñaki Cobos
  • Lighting Design: Olga García Sánchez
  • Additional choreography (Act II, Spanish dance): Antonio Pérez Rodríguez
  • Director of magical illusions: Manu Vera
  • Characterisation, makeup and wigs: Lou Valérie Dubuis
  • World premiere by the National Dance Company of Spain at the Baluarte de Pamplona, ​​on October 26, 2018.

Consciousness and unconsciousness go together hand in hand in this new production of The Nutcracker. Here, the CND embraces the worlds of childhood and adulthood as if they were communicating vessels in which reality and fantasy mix intimately. The narrative is based on Marius Petipa’s libretto—in turn inspired by Alexandre Dumas’ adaptation of the fairytale penned by Ernst Theodor Amadeus Hoffmann. All conspires in this new performance to transport us to a magical universe bursting with dreams, longing and fantasy.

“After eight years’ work and following the success of  ‘Don Quixote’—our first classical production for 25 years—the CND once again stages a great ballet classic: ‘The Nutcracker’. Based on Marius Petipa’s libretto—in turn inspired by E.T.A. Hoffmann’s fairytale, adapted by Alexandre Dumas—the story thrills both adults and children alike, as it floats between two worlds: dreamland and reality, consciousness and unconsciousness, childhood and adulthood. We have staged the action in 1910. The period highlights the contrast between the bourgeois realism of a family party and the imaginary world of Clara,  where her wishes and fears run amok, amidst fantasy imagery; at times wonderful; at times disturbing.  This fine line between reality and fantasy itself expands into a magical universe in which we travel through the memories of our own stories”.

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Don Quixote
21 Sep 2020
Don Quixote
  • Music: Ludwig Minkus
  • Choreography: José Carlos Martínez (inspired on the versions of Marius Petipa and Alexander Gorski)
  • Set Design: Raúl García Guerrero
  • Costumes: Carmen Granell
  • Lighting Design: Nicolás Fischtel (A.A.I.)
  • Characterization, Make up and Idea and Making of Wigs: Lou Valérie Dubuis
  • *Aditional Coreography of Bolero and Fandango: Mayte Chico

“The Don Quixote ballet by Marius Petipa was, together with Swan Lake, one of the most popular ballets in Russia, where it was created in 1896 upon a musical score by Ludwig Minkus. This colourful work broke with the world of supernatural and ethereal creatures that pervaded XIX Century classical ballet, replacing them with normal village people.

The libretto is based on an episode in the second volume of Cervantes’ Don Quixote (Chapter XXI, “In which Camacho’s wedding is continued, with other delightful incidents”). The action here centres more around Quiteria and Basilio’s stormy love affair than the adventures of Don Quijote and Sancho themselves.

I used as a base Marius Petipa’s original choreography, together with the various versions I have had the chance to dance (Nureyev, Baryshnikov, Gorski). It seemed to me important to maintain the ballet’s choreographic structure. But I also wanted to paint a more poetically nuanced Don Quijote in his quest for perfect love, embodied by Dulcinea. At the same time, I needed draw it all into the essence of our own dance. I think it is very important for a Spanish company production of Don Quixote, even if it is a version of a Franco-Russian classic, to be respectful with our culture and tradition”.

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José Carlos Martínez premieres “The Corsair” in Ljubljana
15 Sep 2020
José Carlos Martínez premieres “The Corsair” in Ljubljana

José Carlos Martínez premiered on September 22, in Ljubljana, his new version of “The Corsair”.

The orchestra will be conducted by Mojca Lavrenčič. The costumes were designed by Iñaki Cobos and in the main roles will dance Maia Makhateli, Rita Pollacchi, Vadim Muntagirov, Kenta Yamamoto, Hugo Mbeng and Petar Đorčevski, director of the company.

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Water
31 Oct 2010
Water
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Zoom
31 Oct 2010
Zoom
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To sell
31 Oct 2010
To sell
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The city
31 Oct 2010
The city
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My first ballet class?
16 Sep 2010
My first ballet class?

A long time ago! And it wasn’t really a dance class. I lived with my family in Cartagena, Spain. My little sister was taking dance lessons. One day in December 1979, there was a costume party and my mother asked me to attend with my little sister. I was nine years old. When the professor saw me, she said “Stay with us if you want to.” It was a sort of party that lasted five hours from the afternoon until 9pm. I had a great time. When she saw my mother, the professor told her “He’s got rhythm, this boy. Why doesn’t he study dance?” I thought it was fantastic!

So that’s how I found myself at the bar in a white T-shirt with some sort of tights and Spanish leather slippers that were as hard as wood and caused me huge pain. I got into this to party and ended up suffering like a martyr. My first real course was a genuine disappointment. I expected to dance right away, instead I underwent torture.

Of course, I was the only boy in the class. After the first disappointing experience, I asked “So, when are we going to dance?” Pilar replied, “We’ll do a show in two or three months.” We performed “Grease” and I naturally had the role of John Travolta. So I continued in the dance school, taking three courses a week. One day, Pilar said to my mother that she had taught me everything she could and that I should go elsewhere to study. That’s how I wound up in Cannes, at Rosella Hightower’s school. I met Pilar again when I was awarded the medal of honor of the City of Cartagena. She has also come to see me dance at the Paris Opera.

Today, it’s José’s turn to give classes, with passion, to younger dancers…

Interview with Martine Plannels

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Roles
16 Sep 2010
Roles

Giselle

Mats Ek’s Giselle differs in various ways from all other ballets that I have danced.
It’s in his Giselle that I was first able to show my real personality on stage and where I didn’t need to act. Mats Ek doesn’t want his dancers to play a character, he seeks authentic and personal reactions.
He brings together the performers, aiming to achieve the rapport he’s looking for between the characters. In the beginning, he wanted to try me in the role of Albrecht, but very quickly he realized my personality better matched the role of Hilarion.
The experience is fantastic, because unlike in other ballets, the dancer doesn’t have to identify with anyone but just let the acting come naturally. For both the spectator and the dancer, the vision is very strong, because I react according to how I feel and not because I am obliged.
I feel totally immersed in this ballet, I’m deeply sensitive to it. Usually, when I finish dancing, I become myself once again, and I can go to my dressing room and talk and joke normally. But with Mats Eks’ Giselle it’s different, it’s tough for me to recover. I’m so close to myself on stage, and what happens on stage is so strong that the barriers between Hilarion and José dissolve. And then it’s like what happened on stage also happened to me.
I could dance this Giselle forever. I never want performances to finish. The emotions run so high and are so natural that the slightest difference from one evening to another is magnified. The conditions vary so completely that I never dance the same ballet twice.

Sleeping Beauty

Sleeping Beauty is not my favorite ballet.
I like to dance it though—despite its excessive rigidity and formality—because there is a truly magic moment in the slow variation during the second act. This is a unique sequence in the great academic repertory.
I’ve never really encountered in another ballet the sensation I feel during this six-minute solo, except in Jean-Claude Gallotta’s Nosferatu. At the start of his piece, I’m alone on stage, and as if bewitched by the music, I let myself be brought into the dance. The choreographic moves are obviously very different from those in Sleeping Beauty, but the sensations that I experience dancing the two works on stage are curiously similar.
I think it’s definitely worth it to dance Sleeping Beauty, just for the pleasure of dancing this slow variation, although I know this may appear to be bit of an egotistical approach to the role.
This variation is danced to a violin solo. Because there’s genuine complicity between the dancer and the musician, the choreographed sequences become second to the musical background. It’s the violinist who determines the duration of the balances or the pirouettes that the dancer executes. I adore the start of the variation, the instant when I don’t yet know how the musician will release the music on that particular day and when the dancer must have a tuned ear for the music and the dance to be perfectly aligned.

Swan Lake

When I first began to dance Swan Lake, the role of the prince, especially in the first act, was hard for me.
Right from the start, I chose a modern and very natural way of playing the role. I tried to be quite close to what a prince today could be like, a prince that’s bored. I met with a lot of negative reactions. There were those who thought I had stage fright, others said I was sulky. One time, someone even asked me if I was unhappy because I learned too late about a substitution!
Later, I constructed a very different prince, one with a romantic temperament, but also with much more brio. Physically, he’s at the royal court, but his spirit is very much elsewhere. He’s lost in his dreams. He’s obliged to go through the motions of court life, but has absolutely no desire to do so. In one way, this is also a very true interpretation because it matches a reality for me. I’ve never been happy with too much society life!
Actually, my first interpretation was too modern and too true for a classical ballet, which traditionally remains in a highly stylized universe. I think it would work for a modern version of Swan Lake, like the choreography of Matthew Bourne, which I find very interesting.
I think it’s for essential dancers to adapt their stage performance to the choreographer’s vision of his or her work. In Patrice Bart’s version, for instance, the characters’ psychology is different, and the prince’s role can be handled in a more modern approach. In a ballet, there’s not only a soloist. The rapport between all the characters is important (see Mats Ek’s Giselle).
I think that narrative dance should evolve into more modern characters and portrayals. We can’t dance characters from the late 19th century as they were danced in that century forever.

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Sylvia
28 Jul 2010
Sylvia
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Les Enfants du Paradis, Ballet in two acts by José Carlos Martinez
16 Jul 2010
Les Enfants du Paradis, Ballet in two acts by José Carlos Martinez

Les Enfants du Paradis, created in 2008, is José Martinez’s first major ballet for the Company. Through the memories of the mime Baptiste, the choreography brings to life a long-gone Paris, revealing the magical world of entertainment where the frontiers between reality and illusion are sometimes so tenuous.

  • Music: Marc-Olivier Dupin
  • Choreography: José Martinez (Opéra national de Paris, 2008)
  • Adaptation: François Roussillon et José Martinez
  • Sets: Ezio Toffolutti
  • Costumes: Agnès Letestu
  • Lighting: André Diot
  • The Étoiles, Principal Dancers and Corps de Ballet 
Paris Opera Orchestra
  • Conductor: Jean-François Verdier
  • From june 29th to july 15th of 2011
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“Baptist or the art of gesture”
15 Jul 2010
“Baptist or the art of gesture”

“Baptist or the art of gesture”

“Space director” : Jose Martinez in the executive of the “Centenary Jean-Louis Barrault” at the Theater of the Champs Elysées, Sunday, November 14, 2010.

  • Reader : Clement Hervieu-Leger, boarder of the Comédie-Française
  • Dance : Arantxa Sagardoy
  • “The Language of the body” (extracted)
  • And musics of the Renaud-Barrault Company
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“Memories for tomorrow”, creation, Tel Aviv
15 Jul 2010
“Memories for tomorrow”, creation, Tel Aviv

“Memories for tomorrow”

Choreography of Jose Martinez and Arantxa Sagardoy,
Music Creation: to determine
With Arantxa Sagardoy and Jose Martinez
Duration 13 min

Suzanne Dellal Centre for Dance and Theater, Tel-Aviv
30 (21h00) 31 (22h00) juillet 2010
Box office: 03-5105656 

http://www.suzannedellal.org

Production : www.6-primeagency.com

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Choreographies
15 Jul 2010
Choreographies

Les Enfants du Paradis

Scaramouche

Soli-Ter

Mi Favorita

El Olor de la Ausencia

Delibes Suite

Scarlatti Pas de Deux

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Roles
15 Jul 2010
Roles

New

Le Lac des Cygnes

Esmeralda

Raymonda

In the Middle, Somewhat Elevated

Appartement – Mats Ek


Mats Ek - Appartement - La télévision
envoyé par marc1756. - Films courts et animations.

Le Tricorne


POB - Le Tricorne - Jose Martinez
envoyé par marc1756. - Futurs lauréats du Sundance.

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Press about choreographies
15 Jul 2010
Press about choreographies

El Olor de la Ausencia

(…) To summarize, the ballet par excellence came from José Carlos Martinez’ creation, “The Odor of Absence.” This fascinating ballet spans an array of feelings and extreme sensitivity, narrating the story of a couple separated by death during the Spanish Civil War. Ghyslaine Reichert, in the role of the fiancée and Aurélien Houette, who incarnates both young lover and ghost, were each sensational in this difficult piece where a kiss remains incomplete over eternity and loneliness gains ground inexorably.

Por la Danza
Iratxe de Arancibia

 

Soli-Ter

Funny, serious and uninhibited, “Soli-ter” shows José Carlos Martinez’ most desenfadada side as a choreographer. Three solos for three dancers, each of which illustrates differing facets of this performer from Cartagena.

Por la Danza
Iratxe de Arancibia

 

Mi Favorita

(…) a choreography by José Carlos Martinez, a Cartagena native and Principal Dancer of the Paris Opéra. Without losing his composure, using a marvelous and communicative pas de deux, he shows us that classical notes can enter into an endless musical score and that it’s possible to play with the notes. This is precisely what José Carlos Martinez has done, quite brilliantly and ingeniously.

Levante, el Mercatil Valenciano
Enrique Herreras

 

Charming and comical

(…)The golden palm for best production surely goes to José Carlos Martinez’ Mi Favorita. This principal dancer of the Paris Opéra has crossed to the other side of the stage to create a funny and dynamic ballet to the music of Donizetti. His classical vocabulary is studded with allusions and gags. Mi Favorita also has delightful and humorous costumes imagined by Agnès Letestu—tutus made of red peppers and see-through plastic! And the 10 happy performers are as good dancing as they are acting (…)

René Sirvin, Le Figaro

 

The Young Paris Opéra Dancers

Accounts from the stage

(…) The best comes after the intermission (…) in José Carlos Martinez’ “Mi Favorita.” This is entertainment that sparkles like good champagne. We see a string of dazzling references to repertory in the flow of buoyant dance. The youth and gaiety of the 11 performers splashes deliciously through refreshing choreography. (…)

Jean-Claude Diénis, Dancer

 

The Young Paris Opéra Dancers

With his first choreography, José Carlos Martinez has created a brilliant ballet colored with discrete humor, which we were able to praise at its premier last year in Roissy-en-France (see ImagiDanse, May 27, 2002). Mélanie Hurel, Isabelle Ciaravolla, Dorothé Gilbert, Bruno Bouché, Alessio Carbone, and Nicolas Paul were excellent performers. For the Paris Opéra’s Palais Garnier, principal dancer and choreographer José Carlos Martinez put the finishing touches on his creation for five pairs. Set to Donizetti’s lively music, he created a perfectly structured classical ballet, while amusingly mimicking a few well-known choreographers, from Perrot to Forsythe, from Petipa to Balanchine. The piece is full of entertaining gags, but never exaggerated. The variations are virtuous, especially Simon Valastro’s and the joyous contributions from Florian Magnenet, as well as the solos of Séverine Westermann in a brilliant plastic tutu, Charline Giezendanner in a hoop of crinolin, Pauline Verdusen wearing a belt of long red peppers, and Mijo Fujii, playing a fugitive Giselle. The 10 artists play and dance with joyous conviction. The ballet is enriched by superb crimson and unusual costumes like those described above, imagined and created by Agnès Letestu, balancing taste and intellect. And José Carlos Martinez makes a finale salute to humor, with a flying Sylphide and a dancer striking the pose of Degas’ young 14 year old ballerina! These are simple but subtle allusions. José and Agnès have secured their future the day they decide to stop dancing, but until then we hope to often be able to enjoy their successful and creative partnership.

René Sirvin

 

(…) Mi Favorita, an entertaining ballet for five pairs imagined by José Carlos Martinez. This first choreography transforms classical ballet, through humor and fantasy, into a series of evocations that fit the young artists perfectly. And they take pleasure in being accomplices that bring this joyous moment of pure dance to the stage.

Jérôme Frilley, Danse

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Soli-Ter
15 Jul 2010
Soli-Ter

Soli-Ter, or three solos for one man: “One often finds one’s destiny by taking paths to avoid it.” Jean de La Fontaine

  • Choreography: José Carlos Martinez
  • Music: Fréderic Chopin / Poulenc / St Saens
  • Premier: May 20, 2006, l’Orangerie, Roissy en France

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Scarlatti -Pas de deux
15 Jul 2010
Scarlatti -Pas de deux
  • Choreography: José Carlos Martinez
  • Premier: March 24, 2009, in Chatou, France
  • Music: Domenico Scarlatti
  • Costumes: Agnès Letestu
  • Length: 8 minutes

Inspired by the “divertissement” “Robert Macaire,” choreographed in the second act of “Les Enfants du Paradis,” created for the Paris Opéra in 2008, José Carlos Martinez develops in “Scarlatti” the pas de deux of the Ballerina and Frédéric Lemaître. The ballet accompanies Scarlatti’s piano sonata K 208 adaggio and the cantabile of the sonata in C major K 159.

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The costumes
15 Jul 2010
The costumes

The costumes of  “Les Enfants du Paradis” are from Agnes Letestu.

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Thoughts about the theme of Les Enfants du Paradis
15 Jul 2010
Thoughts about the theme of Les Enfants du Paradis

This historical fresco depicting memories from popular literature revives the idea of a performance within a performance. The characters, borrowed from history, live fictional adventures and eternal passions following in Garance’s footsteps.

Garance is the ballet’s foundation. The fresco takes shape around her and emanates from her. 

A free woman, Garance appears, bearing the burden of an uncertain past, taking into her orbit Frédéric Lemaître, Baptiste, Lacenaire, and the count de Montray. While she brings the dandy unhappiness, she makes the other three characters famous. Then she leaves Paris and, returning after a six-year absence, does what must be done.  Frédéric learns about jealousy and finally has a chance to play Othello. Lacenaire assassinates the count and then waits for his executioner. And Baptiste loses himself in his dreams, experiencing one night of the love that he had before refused.

Garance, the “femme fatale,” disappears in the sea of carnival masks that invades the boulevard du Crime, meeting her destiny.

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From the film to the ballet
15 Jul 2010
From the film to the ballet

One of my main motivations for creating the choreography Les Enfants du Paradis was to develop the tremendous potential and magic of this performance—on stage, facing the audience, and in the wings, making for a troubled mix of real life and the universe of the stage. I also wanted to take advantage of the opportunity to perform this creation at the Palais Garnier, with its pomp, its machinery and its public spaces that resemble the sets of the film.

Les Enfants du Paradis to me is also a highly choreographed film, alternating crowd scenes with duos and trios–a little like in a classical ballet. The camera movements are an integral part of this choreography.

A choreography can suggest situations through body movements, represent emotions through strong images, evoke poetry that speaks to the viewer’s imagination, and show relationships between characters. But because of its very essence, it cannot dwell on anecdotic details or reveal complex psychology that a movie dialog can express with realism or irony.

Dance can provide a translation of the film, which is composed of stark contrasts—the good, the bad, the poor, the rich, the artists, the bourgeoisie, the lovers, and the souls with dry hearts. Without seeking to illustrate Prévert’s subtle and brilliant  dialogs, it’s possible to transpose this popular fresco, the magical poem about crazy love, while keeping the film’s essence, the realism-romanticism so dear to the Carné-Prévert duo.

Les Enfants du Paradis, which has become a well-known cult film, commands respect, of course (meaning not deviating from the original script  and following the authors’ directions), but it also leaves open the possibility to adapt some scenes to live performing.

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Marco Polo – The last mission
15 Jul 2010
Marco Polo – The last mission
  • Three act Ballet
  • Book by Fang Fang and Sylvie Zhang adapted from “The Travels of Marco Polo”
  • A Production of Pierre Cardin and Shanghai ballet
  • Choreography and Staging: José Carlos Martinez
  • Music:Daniel Walker
  • Set and Costume: Pierre Cardin

What motivated me about the Marco Polo ballet creation for the Shanghai National Ballet is the scope of the adventure in which I was being invited to participate: To discover a new culture, a little bit like Marco Polo himself when he journeyed to the Orient a few centuries ago to become acquainted with the habits and customs of its people.

It was my turn to be a world traveler, to go and seek out this civilization, to bring our different sensitivities face to face, and to create a personal and unusual ballet.

In my previous choreographies, I have always integrated the traditions of classical dance, to which I like to add a more contemporary flow. My desire to use classical vocabulary to write choreographic movement of today has grown through my experience and meetings with choreographers…Mats Ek, Forsythe, Kylian, Pina Bausch and many other choreographers have influenced me as a dancer and then in my approach to choreography.

Creating a ballet about a legendary figure like Marco Polo is naturally a challenge! But I like to tell stories–through the characters and theatre, through direction and dance—taking the viewer into my imaginary universe.

Of course, I did not make this journey alone. In the end, the ballet has become the talent of all those who worked to bring it to its destination.

In particular, I would like to thank Pierre Cardin, who was confident that I could lead this project, and Brigitte Lefèvre, the director of the Paris Opera ballet, for allowing me to embark on this voyage to the Orient.

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Mi favorita
15 Jul 2010
Mi favorita
  • Choreography: José Martínez
  • Music: Gaetano Donizetti
  • Costumes: Agnès Letestu
  • Dedicated to José Ferran
  • Premier: 2002

Any resemblance to existing, well-known ballets is not an accident. The choreographer would like to extend his thanks to: Marius Petipa, William Forsythe, George Balanchine, Rudolf Nureyev, Fred Astaire, Jiri Kylian, Pierre Lacotte, L. Ivanov, C. Brumachon, Patrice Bart, J. Perrot and J. Coralli, H. Lander, Jean-Claude Gallotta, Maurice Béjart … and last but not least, King Louis XIV.

“The perky, spruced music of ballets in 19th century operas make your body itch to dance. The sequences meant to entertain from Gaetano Donizetti’s La Favorite are particularly dynamic—they’re alive, lyrical, and flowery—and they motivated me to adjust some steps, playing with virtuosity.”

For his first choreography, José Carlos Martinez drew from his experience as a classical dancer. But he breaks loose from the repertory, looking for amusement, turning away from the base through his use of wit.

 

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Orphée et Eurydice
8 Jul 2010
Orphée et Eurydice
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Ivan Le Terrible – photo : Icare
8 Jul 2010
Ivan Le Terrible – photo : Icare
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Till L’espiègle – photo J. Moatti
8 Jul 2010
Till L’espiègle – photo J. Moatti
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Parade – photo E. Smietana
8 Jul 2010
Parade – photo E. Smietana
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Nosferatu – photo Icare
8 Jul 2010
Nosferatu – photo Icare
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Nosferatu – photo Icare
8 Jul 2010
Nosferatu – photo Icare
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Le Lac des Cygnes – photo Icare
8 Jul 2010
Le Lac des Cygnes – photo Icare
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Le Lac des Cygnes – photo Icare
8 Jul 2010
Le Lac des Cygnes – photo Icare
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La Bayadère
8 Jul 2010
La Bayadère
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Ivan Le Terrible – photo J. Moatti
8 Jul 2010
Ivan Le Terrible – photo J. Moatti
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In The Middle – photo Jésus Vallinas
8 Jul 2010
In The Middle – photo Jésus Vallinas
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Giselle – Mats Ek
8 Jul 2010
Giselle – Mats Ek
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Giselle – Mats Ek – photo Icare
8 Jul 2010
Giselle – Mats Ek – photo Icare
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Giselle – photo J. Moatti
8 Jul 2010
Giselle – photo J. Moatti
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Studies
8 Jul 2010
Studies
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Copellia – photo J. Moatti
8 Jul 2010
Copellia – photo J. Moatti
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Cendrillon – photo Icare
8 Jul 2010
Cendrillon – photo Icare
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Boléro – photo S. Mathé
8 Jul 2010
Boléro – photo S. Mathé
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Boléro – photo S. Mathé
8 Jul 2010
Boléro – photo S. Mathé
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Appartement – Mats Ek
8 Jul 2010
Appartement – Mats Ek
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Agnes Letestu – Diamonds – photo Icare
8 Jul 2010
Agnes Letestu – Diamonds – photo Icare
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Agnes Letestu – Don Quixotte – photo Icare
8 Jul 2010
Agnes Letestu – Don Quixotte – photo Icare
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Agnes Letestu – Eja Mater – photo J. Moatti
8 Jul 2010
Agnes Letestu – Eja Mater – photo J. Moatti
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Agnes Letestu – Giselle – photo J. Moatti
8 Jul 2010
Agnes Letestu – Giselle – photo J. Moatti
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Agnes Letestu – Giselle – photo H. Soumireu-Lartigue
8 Jul 2010
Agnes Letestu – Giselle – photo H. Soumireu-Lartigue
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Agnes Letestu – Giselle – photo Icare
8 Jul 2010
Agnes Letestu – Giselle – photo Icare
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Delphine Moussin – Ivan Le Terrible – photo Icare
8 Jul 2010
Delphine Moussin – Ivan Le Terrible – photo Icare
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Agnes Letestu – Le Lac des Cygnes – photo J. Moatti
8 Jul 2010
Agnes Letestu – Le Lac des Cygnes – photo J. Moatti
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Agnes Letestu – Non rien de rien – photo K. Hasegawa
8 Jul 2010
Agnes Letestu – Non rien de rien – photo K. Hasegawa
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Alice Renavand – Orphée et Eurydice – photo S. Vigeveno
8 Jul 2010
Alice Renavand – Orphée et Eurydice – photo S. Vigeveno
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Eleonora Abbagnato – Orphée et Eurydice – photo M. Vanden Abeele
8 Jul 2010
Eleonora Abbagnato – Orphée et Eurydice – photo M. Vanden Abeele
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Agnes Letestu – Slynguerland – photo K. Hasegawa
8 Jul 2010
Agnes Letestu – Slynguerland – photo K. Hasegawa
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S. Zakarova – La Belle au Bois Dormant – photo Icare
8 Jul 2010
S. Zakarova – La Belle au Bois Dormant – photo Icare
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Agnes Letestu – Giselle – photo Jésus Vallinas
8 Jul 2010
Agnes Letestu – Giselle – photo Jésus Vallinas
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Marie-Agnes Gillot – Sylvia – photo S. Vigeveno
8 Jul 2010
Marie-Agnes Gillot – Sylvia – photo S. Vigeveno
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Copellia – photo H. Soumireu-Lartigue
7 Jul 2010
Copellia – photo H. Soumireu-Lartigue
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Portrait – Photo copyright
7 Jul 2010
Portrait – Photo copyright
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Keep go moving… Gigi Caciuleanu – Photo droits réservés
7 Jul 2010
Keep go moving… Gigi Caciuleanu – Photo droits réservés
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Giselle – Mats Ek – Photo J. Moatti
7 Jul 2010
Giselle – Mats Ek – Photo J. Moatti
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Tempations Of the Moon – Photo J. Moatti
7 Jul 2010
Tempations Of the Moon – Photo J. Moatti
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Agnes Letestu –  Webern Opus 5 –  Photo H. Soumireu-Lartigue
7 Jul 2010
Agnes Letestu – Webern Opus 5 – Photo H. Soumireu-Lartigue
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Le Lac des Cygnes – photo Icare – Moatti
7 Jul 2010
Le Lac des Cygnes – photo Icare – Moatti
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Shéhérazade – photo H. Soumireu-Lartigue
7 Jul 2010
Shéhérazade – photo H. Soumireu-Lartigue
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Webern opus 5 – photo H. Soumireu-Lartigue
7 Jul 2010
Webern opus 5 – photo H. Soumireu-Lartigue
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Le Tricorne – Photo E. Smietana
7 Jul 2010
Le Tricorne – Photo E. Smietana
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El Olor de la Ausencia
6 Jul 2010
El Olor de la Ausencia
  • Choreography and costumes: José Martínez
  • Music: Spanish popular music/ Songs of the Spanish Civil War, Ramon Lopez Quartet
  • Premier: July 20, 2007, Picasso Museum, Malaga, Spain

The Odor of Absence focuses on the losses of loved ones during Spain’s Civil War.

“In vain, you trace hearts on the window:
The high chief of silenceBelow in the castle courtyard, recruits the soldiers.”

Paul Celan

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Delibes Suite
6 Jul 2010
Delibes Suite

“Using the music of French composer Léo Delibes, which exemplifies ballet music in the 19th century, I created a classical pas de deux—an entrée, an adagio, a variation for each dancer, and a coda. I’ve slipped in an extra touch of tender irony into the choreography of episodes of valor that are traditional fixtures in dance galas.”

  • Choreography: José Carlos Martinez
  • Music: Léo Delibes; extracts from La Source (1866), act II scène 16; scene and pas d’action 21 and variation, extract from Coppélia (1870), act III – “La Fileuse” (Le Travail) and “Galop Final”
  • Costumes: Agnès Letestu
  • Premier: March 16, 2003, L’Orangerie, Roissy en France ( with Isabelle Ciaravola et Bruno Bouché)
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Webern opus 5 – photo H. Soumireu-Lartigue
30 Jun 2010
Webern opus 5 – photo H. Soumireu-Lartigue
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Japan, towns
30 Jun 2010
Japan, towns
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Japan, people
30 Jun 2010
Japan, people
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Japan, night
30 Jun 2010
Japan, night
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Japan, nature
30 Jun 2010
Japan, nature
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Japan, scattered pictures
30 Jun 2010
Japan, scattered pictures
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Scaramouche
21 Jun 2010
Scaramouche

It was Paris Opéra dance director Brigitte Lefèvre that thought I was best placed to create a ballet based on composer Darius Milhaud’s Scaramouche for the Opéra’s dance school. With a free hand, I reunited Scaramouche with the “Commedia dell’arte,” mixing in a series of repertory ballets that Elisabeth Platel’s dance school pupils dreamed of dancing one day.

Josseline Le Bourhis assisted me with the historical research. Then I visited the dance school in Nanterre to select the dancers that I would work with. I observed them from behind the studios’ windows and then saw them waiting for me with a happy undercurrent of excitement, practicing their pirouettes, clowning around and letting their imaginations run wild! And so I decided to show things as they were, to show what happens before a dance course. The Scaramouche ballet became a dreamy getaway into the imaginations of the pupils before they embrace once again on the discipline of dance training.

This was the first ballet I created for young children. To get to know them better, I set up choreographic workshops as I would have done with professional dancers. During these sessions, I ask them to improvise movements associated with a theme or a musical passage. As the days passed, they shed their initial reserve and unleashed their creativity. In my ballet, I integrated the most interesting of their proposals. My ballet follows the pattern of classical ballets: act one presents the characters as the plot unfolds; act two opens to a dreamlike world and serves as a placeholder; and the final act entertains. All modes of expression have their place in the piece: pantomime, repertory dance, fantasies or improvisations developed in the spirit of the Commedia dell’arte, as well as voice and musical instruments. All the characters from Italian comedy are recognizable through their costumes, except Scaramouche, who deviates from his usual role. For the costumes, Agnès Letestu transformed the historical characters of the Commedia dell’arte using contemporary forms and fabrics, while preserving historical details. For instance, Harlequin’s costume combines a customary little ruffled collar with a suit made from denim.

  • Idea, choreography and scenography: José Carlos Martinez
  • Assistant choreographer:  Béatrice Martel
  • Music: Darius Milhaud (Scaramouche 1937) – additional music Camille Saint-Saëns, Piotr Ilyitch Tchaikovski, Ludwig Minkus, and selected “Bulerias” rthyms.
  • Musical preparation: Scott Alan Prouty
  • Piano and musical arrangement:  Vessela Pelovska, Michel Dietlin
  • Costumes: Agnès Letestu
  • Lighting: Marc Anrochte
  • Premier: March 26, 2005  – Ecole de Danse de l’Opéra National de Paris – Palais Garnier
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Press
16 Jun 2010
Press

Slender and well bred, José Carlos Martinez establishes himself through his stylistic rigor and his elegance. And his characters bear the imprint of his original and engaging personality.

Antoine d’Alarson

 

José Carlos Martinez stupefies us with his virtuosity and his princely authority.

His style is admirable. A presence like his is rare.

René Sirvin

 

Jose Martinez rapidly stood out through his sytlistic rigor and elegance. Today, Jose Martinez is one of the luminaries of the new generation.

Attilio Labis

 

José Carlos Martinez is one of the greatest dancers of our age. He has discretion, nobility, elegance, class, and hierarchy. Each movement he makes carries significance.

ABC Julio Bravo

 

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Tribute to José Ferran
16 Jun 2010
Tribute to José Ferran

Through courses and workshops and with your advice, of course. And sometimes through screams! Through the will to fight relentlessly against the vagaries of time passing, against the aging that strikes dancers’ mistreated bodies all too fast, against passing fads for certain physiques, against the aptitudes of those who are supposedly against dance. You instill your credo in us: willpower. But that’s not all.

The intelligence of the movement exuded your state-of-the-art instructions. Never a placement too many or an obsessional drift away from technique that sometimes takes precedence over the consciousness of being on stage. Your lessons always included respect for others, without body bullying or maiming dietary restrictions. What do women want?

Because of your love for ballerinas, you knew how to transmit—without making us read Freud—fragility, doubt, and the blunders that professional ballerinas confront.

In this aspect, your teaching went beyond today’s methods, and the boundary between classical and contemporary dance was erased.

You understood human beings, respected their choices, and underpinned their motivation, but you didn’t spare their flaws. An “étoile” dancer, a choreographer or an amateur. From José Carlos Martinez, the little PEPITO to Renato Zanella and Jean Christophe Maillot, that you brought together for the ballet “Nuit,” (Night)…passing by all the others that danced for you the forgotten jewel “Ma Mère l’Oie” to a Bellini aria.

 You who made pirate copies of operas with your friends! You who were so proud to have danced with Violette Verdy, and also with Leslie Caron in musical comedies like “Daddy Long Legs,” where you had a great time. You who were a one-man band and professor under Béjart, dancer, particularly in “Le Loup,” and substitute ballet master in Roland Petit’s troupe. You who made your stage debut at the Liceo theatre, in the city where you were born, Barcelona, and you who who were hired at your first audition at age 16. You who were there, right when Cuevas started, traveling from Monte Carlo to Paris, departing and returning…

You met “Madame Rosella,” as the pupils called her, when she went to Barcelona. You are the walls, the soul, the spirit, and also the PINCH of seriousness of the Cannes school. “We’re not here to have tea, here we dance!” is what you used to sometimes shout at the top of your voice to revive muscles gone numb from the summer.

You would deny us applause at the end of our classes. You would say that “it would go to our head.” Consequently, our silence was just love in return. And we would leave, eager for the next class. As long as we were on time! But allow us today the pleasure of honoring you, please. Dance is present through you. You taught us so much. Thank you.

José Ferran died Feb. 2, 2000, in Barcelona.

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Paquita
15 Jun 2010
Paquita
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Roméo et Juliette
15 Jun 2010
Roméo et Juliette
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Very close to stars
15 Jun 2010
Very close to stars
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Appartement – Mats Ek
15 May 2010
Appartement – Mats Ek
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Cendrillon
15 May 2010
Cendrillon
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La Dame aux Camélias
15 May 2010
La Dame aux Camélias
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La Danse
15 May 2010
La Danse
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Le Lac des Cygnes
15 May 2010
Le Lac des Cygnes
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Great ballets of the Opera National de Paris
15 May 2009
Great ballets of the Opera National de Paris
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False farewell
15 Jul 2005
False farewell
Jose Martinez will not bid his official farewell with the National Opera of Paris at the end of the season 2010-2011 in the “Children of the Paradise”, as opposed to what Ariane Bavelier announces in the Figaro.
Jose Martinez will not bid his official farewell with the National Opera of Paris at the end of the season 2010-2011 in the “Children of the Paradise”, as opposed to what Ariane Bavelier announces in the Figaro.
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Bolero – photo S. Mathé
11 Jul 2005
Bolero – photo S. Mathé
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Children of the Paradise
10 Jul 2005
Children of the Paradise
  • Ballet in two acts Based on the play by Jacques Prévert
  • Choreography: José Carlos Martinez
  • Music: Marc-Olivier Dupin (under special request from l’Opéra national de Paris)
  • Adaptation: François Roussillon and José Carlos Martinez
  • Set design: Ezio Toffolutti
  • Costumes: Agnès Letestu
  • Lighting: André Diot
  • Choreograph Assistant: Arantxa Sagardoy
  • Premier: October 21, 2008; Palais Garnier – Opéra National de Paris

With the nineteenth century, on the boulevard of the Crime and in its theaters, between dark jugglers and travelling acrobats, taverns and cabarets spreads this large popular fresco that Jose Martinez, inspired by the ` Enfants of the paradise’, adapts in ballet. ` Theater of the funambulists’, in slide, on scene, with the floor or the paradise are played the inaccessible loves and jealousy. Magic of the spectacle and its mysteries, a universe is revealed in which the real life and the theater are mixed.

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